Flowers For George Washington

First in War, First in Peace, First in the Garden

Archive for the tag “2011”

A New Year Is Upon Us

This week’s bunch of fresh cut flowers honor those who won’t be with us to shepherd in the new year. As 2011 ends I think of all those who departed; some too early, others right on time. And here we are – left to carry on without them. So what do we do with the ever shortening time we have left? Do we spend it on frivolous tidings or do we start to impact those around us in some positive fashion. This is what we as a culture did in 2011. What will you do in 2012?

“My brave fellows, you have done all I asked you to do and more than could be reasonably expected.  But your country is at stake, your wives, your houses and all you hold dear. If you will consent to stay one month longer, you will render that service to the cause of liberty and to your country which you probably can never do under any other circumstances.”

George Washington, January 1777

December 30, 2011 Marina del Rey Gelsons

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Oh by gosh, by golly…

This week’s bunch of fresh cut flowers are a Winter’s Mix of Hollyberry and Fern. The holly’s bright red berries offer a lovely visual contrast to the prickly thorns of the leaf itself. I am reminded that even as we celebrate the holidays and spend time with family and friends, we are in the midst of a global economic crisis and are certainly teetering on the peaks of great change. Where we will land is anyone’s guess. What can we do collectively to ensure the safest possible landing?

“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.”

The Crisis by Thomas Paine written on December 23, 1776 which General Washington had read to the troops to boost morale during the depths of the first bleak winter of the Revolutionary War

December 18, 2011 Westchester Bristol Farms

Summer Stock and Tea Parties

This week’s bunch of fresh cut flowers are Matthiola Incana, commonly known as Hoary or Ten Weeks Stock, which seems analogous to our current congressional participants (across both the upper and lower houses), a ill-mannered lot whose remarkable amateurish performance suggests hopeful actors attending the Ogunquit Playhouse in Maine, where they could apprentice (paying $150 for the summer) to learn their craft and observe—and possibly work with—professionals.

Is this the best our country can offer in the way of representation?

“My best way of thanking voters was by making their interests my own and doing everything that lies in my little power, for the honor and welfare of the country.”

George Washington 1758

December 10, 2011 Manhattan Beach Whole Foods Market

Mon Ami, what happened to our Bonhomie?

This week’s bunch of freshly cut flowers are vibrant yellow French Tulips, which were first introduced to the West in the late 1500’s by an illegitimate Flemish herbalist who became the Austrian ambassador to the Ottoman Empire in Constantinople. While Tulips have long been a spring flower, certain varietals can flourish throughout the summer into fall and even winter as long as they avoid an early frost

“It is a maxim founded on the universal experience of mankind that no nation is to be trusted farther than it is bound by its interest.” George Washington on his relationship with the French – 1778

December 3, 2011 Santa Monica Farmers Market

Dead Pokemon Walking

This week’s bunch of freshly cut bloomers are bright yellow and orange Marigolds. Regarded as the flower of the dead in pre-Hispanic Mexico, they are still widely used in Day of the Dead celebrations, which seems somewhat appropriate as we say goodbye to the oddly contentious yet eternally hopeful Herman Cain presidential campaign.

“Party disputes and personal quarrels are the great business of the day while the great and accumulated debt, ruined finances, depreciated money, and want of credit were postponed from day to day, from week to week, as if our affairs wore the most promising aspect.” George Washington, circa 1778.

November 20, 2011 Westchester Bristol Farms

Feed Your Hunger

This week’s bunch of fresh cut flowers are orange Safflowers, which is not only one of humanities oldest species, but is also known as Bastard Saffron because of its use as a cheaper version of Saffron. The oil from its seeds also forms the base of the white gook my father lovingly lathered on his sunday tuna fish sandwiches. Which just goes to prove that this herbacious flower serves a greater purpose than merely being a prickly, yet attractive accoutrement to suburban living, something to keep in mind as we enter this holiday season.

“Let the hospitality of the house with respect to the poor be kept up.” “Let no one go hungry away… provided it does not encourage them in idleness.” George Washington circa 1762

November 13, 2011 Westchester Bristol Farms

Are you prepared to change in order to live a better life?

This week’s bunch of fresh cut flowers are Cardinal and Gold Fall Mums (apologies to the troops hunkering down in the fields of Westwood). Their rich autumnal colors signal the natural order of change that surrounds us. It also makes me wonder at how hard we humans fight change of any sort and what we are willing to compromise in order to avoid it.

“Is the paltry consideration of a little dirty pelf to individuals to be placed in competition with the essential rights and liberties of the present generation and of millions yet unborn?” George Washington, 1778

November 5, 2011 Westchester Bristol Farms

Occupy Renew

This week’s bunch of fresh flowers are pink Asiatic Lillies. Their lush openness encourages me to renew my faith and stand up strong for what is right and fair. Greed and fear are the opponents in this fight and apathy is the narcotic that diminishes us. So breathe deep, take hope, and challenge yourself to renew your investment in our collective future with whatever you have to give; time, money, thought, energy, rabble rousing or simple consideration.

“Providence has done much for us in this contest but we must do something for ourselves, if we expect to go triumphantly through with it.” George Washington 1782

October 29, 2011 Playa Vista Farmers Market

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